Thawing:

Place 2 days worth of food in the refrigerator right away so you can begin 2 days after that. Then simply move 2 days worth of food to the refrigerator every other day so you always have a thawed portion that’s ready to feed. For optimal freshness and safety, your refrigerator should be 40º or below and thawed raw meat should be consumed within 3 days.

Dogs:
Most dogs will readily eat refrigerator temperature food. If anything is not eaten after 45 minutes, put it back in the refrigerator for later. Some dogs will throw up if they eat it too fast and it's too cold so you may want to allow it to warm up a bit or you can add some hot water if that happens.

Dogs may be hesitant at first with raw meaty bones if they haven’t ever eaten them before. Your dog may sniff at it for a while and not know quite what to do. Eating them slowly is fine. If possible, it's best to feed RMBs outside. They can be messy and dogs like to try to take them somewhere else in the house. Like your couch ; )

In the beginning you may see stools that are loose, odd or not happening. This is completely normal and natural when switching to a raw diet. You may see some soft, badly formed, oddly textured and/or oddly colored stool, sometimes with mucus. Dogs sometimes have trouble digesting raw food properly after being on highly processed commercial food and it takes a while for everything to start working properly. It is not unusual to have a day or two without a bowel movement. Once the digestive system has adapted, you will see stool that is firm, small, essentially odorless and quick to dry out and decompose.

Cats:
Cats tend to prefer their food room temperature and may wait until it’s warmed up a bit to eat it. Once removed from the refrigerator, leave it sit out for 30 minutes or so to warm up. Most cats and kittens will eat it right away or after a few minutes of checking it out, maybe just sniffing and licking it at first.

If your cat doesn't seem interested after the first few tries, mix it in with the current food and keep increasing the percentage of raw until it's all raw. If this doesn't work and your cat is used to eating kibble, you may need to switch to wet food first. Then you can mix the raw in with the wet food and transition your cat to all raw. Hang in there, it can take a few weeks and a lot of patience.

In the beginning you may see stools that are loose, odd or not happening. This is completely normal and natural when switching to a raw diet. You may see some soft, badly formed, oddly textured and/or oddly colored stool, sometimes with mucus. Cats sometimes have trouble digesting raw food properly after being on highly processed commercial food and it takes a while for everything to start working properly. It is not unusual to have a day or two without a bowel movement. Once the digestive system has adapted, you will see stool that is firm, small, essentially odorless and quick to dry out and decompose.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions.